Every year, it’s the same. We vow to do better, to buy better. And then the December panic hits, the kids start wailing for plastic tat, and everything goes to pot.

 

But if 2020 has made one thing clear, it’s that every pound we spend has consequences. And while we all know who we don’t want to spend with (*cough, Amazon…), how do we wade through the greenwashing to ensure the right business owners are happy dancing this December?

 

Well, that’s where we come in. Over the next two days, we’ll be rounding up our favourite ethical enterprises offering Christmas gifting ideas without the guilt. We’ve personally selected every business you’ll find here based on our admiration for their eco credentials, ethical practices and charitable endeavours, and we’re very confident in saying each represents money well spent.  

 

First up, gifts for the stylish women in your life…

 

Collingwood-Norris

‘Shuna’, ‘Berneray’, ‘Rona’ and ‘Rum’ lambswool scarves, £105 each, Collingwood-Norris

 

Founded by knitwear obsessive Flora Collingwood-Norris, this brand’s accessories are as beautiful as they are environmentally-sound. Using mulesing-free lambswool that’s spun and dyed in Scotland using GOTS-approved dyes, everything Collingwood-Norris produces is either hand-framed or made in small batches and hand-finished in the Scottish Borders.

 

Flora also offers a visible mending service and runs mending workshops using her affordable kits, to ensure customers are able to love and enjoy their knitwear for as long as possible.

 

Shop the collection here

 

Lina Wil

Porcelain jewellery dish in eggshell, £35, ‘Mellow’ pendant, £140, ‘Mellow’ earrings, £250, ‘Mercury’ pendant, £160, and ‘Mercury’ earrings, £295, all Lina Wil

 

German-born designer Lina Wilckens trained at Stockholm’s renowned Konstfack University, and her simple, chic Scandi aesthetic is everything you’d expect from such a pedigree. Her jewellery and homewares collection merges sustainable materials and traditional processes with digital sculpting techniques, while everything from prototyping to packaging is done with an eye on the environment.

 

From reclaimed silver and gold jewellery to hand-glazed ceramics, everything is produced by hand in limited quantities at Lina’s studio in Glasgow, and the result is a range that elevates the everyday into something with a true luxury aesthetic that’ll win any gifter serious plaudits. Keep your eyes peeled for our little Lina Wil giveaway, coming on Instagram very soon…

 

Shop the collection here

 

Dora Larsen

‘Maria’ underwire bra, £56, and low-rise knicker, £32, Dora Larsen
Image: Mafalda Silva

 

Founded by lingerie designer Georgia Larsen, this brand is known and loved for its beautiful and unusual colour combinations – but it’s the focus on sustainability that makes it truly stand out. In recent months, Georgia has overhauled her entire business to move its ethical ethos front and centre, producing in smaller batches, using recycled and organic, natural fabrics and ensuring visibility throughout the supply chain.

 

Every month, the company selects a charity championing social or environmental progress, donating a pound for every online sale, and while even the packaging has been overhauled to reduce the brand’s footprint, the aesthetic and functionality remains as on-point as ever. The best bit? The delicate, whimsical feel extends all the way up to an F-cup.

 

Shop the collection here

 

FINDRA

‘Betty’ merino fine-striped neck warmer, £30, FINDRA

 

Founded by Scottish designer Alex Feechan, this unisex brand offers up a versatile range of sustainable outdoor clothing and accessories, produced in the small textile village of Innerleithen. Known for its use of merino wool and recycled fabrics, FINDRA’s inspiration comes from Alex’s love of the outdoors – though you don’t need to be an experienced hiker to appreciate the comfort and warmth the range offers up.

 

While the brand was born out of a need for stylish yet functional women’s cold weather gear, its Designed by Demand menswear collection, launched in 2018, ensures it now offers something for everyone venturing out into the chill this winter – even if your adventures aren’t currently taking you beyond the school run…

 

Shop the collection here

 

Lora Gene

The Genie Box, £30, Lora Gene

 

Founded by designer Lora Nikolaev Gene, this size-inclusive contemporary womenswear brand is the very definition of sustainable, boasting B-Corp status and producing every item to order within its own small atelier. Following the highest ethical and environmental standards from start to finish, the range is created using deadstock fabric wherever possible, created by workers paid fairly and well above market rate.

 

Recently, the business has branched into ethical and sustainable skincare, and its Genie Box, featuring a Genie rosewater facial spritz (£19) and two 100 per cent pure Mulberry silk facemasks (£19 each) offers tremendous value for money, as well as making the restraints of 2020 that much more bearable. Ethical fashion fans, meanwhile, will adore the size-inclusive capsule range created in collaboration with Aja Barber.

 

Shop the collection here

 

Ethereal London

‘Kaya’ silk bamboo loungewear set £225 to £245, ‘Gaia’ silk bamboo kimono, £205, silk eye mask, £45,  and silk cushion, £85, Ethereal London

 

Created by designer Annie Holt, Ethereal London is renowned for its beautiful, feminine occasion dresses and flattering everyday garments, such as this ideal for 2020 loungewear set. But while the aesthetic might be understated and elegant, the ethos behind the wares is as strong as they come.

 

Produced using sustainable fabrics, such as merino, silk and bamboo, everything is both responsibly sourced and produced, with people and planet considered at every step. We also love the range of customisation and bespoke options, covering everything from altered sleeve-lengths to a complete bespoke service, ensuring the most flattering fit in pieces you’ll return to time and again.

 

Shop the collection here

 

Xi Atelier

‘Bodhi’ hand-quilted top, £230, Xi Atelier

 

This small, independent label, founded by Sophie Chen, creates handmade slow-fashion staples with a sleek, contemporary aesthetic. Sophie’s focus is on creating pieces that will last, using natural fabrics and traditional craftsmanship that is the antithesis of throwaway fast-fashion.

 

This Bodhi top is a prime example of her offering – handmade to order in Sophie’s studio in Glasgow and featuring Japanese Sashiko stitching in an abstract wave pattern, the detailing, from the neck ties to the curved sleeves, is exquisite, yet eminently wearable. Available in sizes six to 16, Bodhi is crafted from 100 per cent Oeko-Tex certified cotton to ensure durability, breathability and comfort. Delivery time is around three weeks, meaning you’ll need to get in by December 4 to guarantee arrival before Christmas.

 

Order directly from Sophie through Instagram here

 

Birdsong London

Black bamboo silk jumpsuit, £240, Birdsong London

 

London-based womenswear label Birdsong is a brand created entirely out of an anti-fast fashion ethos. From delicate wrap dresses to slogan tees, the brand’s garments, offered in sizes six to 30, are all made by skilled seamstresses who’ve faced barriers to employment and now work within women’s groups and charities in London. From two knitting circles run by elderly women, to a group of migrant seamstresses who act as a support network for each other in Limehouse, every item is created by women paid a living wage. Birdsong itself, meanwhile, is run as a social enterprise, donating at least 50 per cent of profits back into the initiatives it supports.

 

“Wearing our collection of original wardrobe staples is a protest in itself– against the fast nature of the fashion industry, against the obsessive pursuit of trends and against the systematic abuse of women in the production line,” Birdsong says. “We know that women want more from their wardrobe but that the world of ethical, sustainable and local fashion can be a minefield. So, we’ve ticked all the boxes for you.”

 

Shop the collection here

 

Kohl Kreatives

The Flex Collection brush set, £44.99, Kohl Kreatives

 

It’s a rare firm that sets out to make not a penny of profit, but Kohl Kreatives has done just that. While its doing a roaring trade in its sustainably-made make-up brushes, the brand ploughs all of its profits into Kohl Kares, its own charitable consultancy offering make-up tuition and support to transitioning transgender people and cancer survivors. 

 

The organisation also offers help and support for those with motor disability and disease, providing tutorials to help them enjoy make-up application. The brushes, meanwhile, are designed to be as universally easy to use as possible, with easy grip handles, stand-up bases and super-soft vegan bristles that’ll make them a welcome addition to any beauty buff’s bathroom cabinet.

 

Shop the collection here

 

ReJean Denim

Custom jacket, £295, Rejean Denim

 

We all know that there’s already too much fashion in the world – and in landfill – but what to do about the issue? Designer Siobhan McKenna may just have the solution. Her unisex label, Rejean Denim, lovingly handcrafts jackets, bags and accessories to order, using 100 per cent reclaimed fabrics.

 

The resulting garments aren’t just one-of-a-kind either. Created in collaboration with customers, every detail from sleeve length to stitching style is up for discussion, meaning the resulting items are created to fit perfectly and be worn again and again. Not sure how to create a perfect piece for someone you love? This Christmas, the brand is also offering gift vouchers, meaning you don’t just give fashion, you’re also gifting the experience of creating something truly custom from scratch. And what fashion lover wouldn’t love you for that?

 

Find out more, or shop the collection, here

 

LAW Design Studio

100 per cent wool ‘Georgia’ coat, £220, LAW Design Studio

 

While made-to-order fashion can go a long way to tackling the industry’s overstock problem, the term can be daunting to those who believe it to be out of their price range. LAW Design Studio, however, is here to prove that assumption wrong.

 

Designer Gillian McNeill might craft every piece to order, but her no-waste circular approach ensures her timeless, ageless, classic items are affordable, accessible and truly made to last – take this beautiful, 100 per cent boiled wool coat as an example. The Glasgow-based brand uses only 100 per cent natural fabrics, and when Gillian is busy enough to require help, she relies on local freelance machinists empowered to work flexibly around their own childcare needs.

 

The brand has even created its own circular shop, inviting customers to send back their pre-loved LAW items to be restocked and sold on to new buyers at reduced price, truly closing the loop and ensuring items are given the longest possible life. It doesn’t get much more sustainable than that!

 

Shop the collection here

 

Beira

Limited edition ‘Elena’ jacket, £250, Beira

 

When she’s not lecturing in sustainable fashion practices, or writing about the industry as The Flock’s resident expert, Dr Antoinette Fionda-Douglas is running her own small fashion label, Beira, crafting limited edition pieces using the fabric offcuts left behind by some of the world’s foremost luxury houses.

 

All of the brand’s outerwear and accessories are created in Italy, within the same factories as the luxury brands the fabric is sourced from, ensuring minimal environmental impact, while the seamstresses are paid well above industry average.

 

The result is a series of beautiful, quality garments, made to last and priced accessibly, all in a bid to prove that style can be sustainable, ethical and truly luxurious, without coming at a cost to people or planet.

 

Shop the collection here

 

Full disclosure

Every brand contained within this guide has been selected by The Flock and invited to feature on account of their sustainable, ethical and/or charitable credentials. The for-profit brands included have each made a small payment to help fund the cost of researching and producing the guide. No affiliate links have been used, and The Flock will receive no income for any sales made as a result of inclusion within this guide.

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